Henri Lefebvre’s “Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche”

It seems common practice nowadays to fit Marx into one kind of triad or another. Marx-Lenin-Mao, for instance. Or Marx-Freud-Nietzsche - Ricoeur’s three “masters of suspicion.” Henri Lefebvre, eclectic and imaginative as ever, gives us his own triad of Continental giants in his aptly titled, newly translated, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche (or, The Realm of Shadows). … Continue reading Henri Lefebvre’s “Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche”

Some Thoughts from Reading Althusser

The attempt to turn back to theory such that the Marxist approach to knowledge itself can be explained is commendable. The (re)introduction of certain levels of abstraction - particularly the separation of the "mode of production" and the "social formation" - are important and remain influential, impressively they have become important in some forms of anthropological practice itself. But many the most important features of Althusser's work are themselves marred by the entire "problematic" or theory of theory that they are integrated within. There’s a circularity to Althusser’s claim of at once maintaining fidelity to Marx’s word while stating that Marx’s words couldn’t be Marxist enough. The autonomous theory still has to try and connect to reality, but it simultaneously wants to refute the “empiricist” subject/object relationship. Althusser’s solution is unclear, and perhaps contradictory.

The Biography, The Accounting of Life, Will Come – (Blanchot, Judgement, the Question of Political Redemption)

"Proletarian revolutions criticize themselves constantly, interrupt themselves continually in their own course, come back to the apparently accomplished in order to begin it afresh, deride with unmerciful thoroughness the inadequacies, weaknesses and paltryness of their first attempts, seem to throw down their adversary only that he may draw new strength from the earth and rise … Continue reading The Biography, The Accounting of Life, Will Come – (Blanchot, Judgement, the Question of Political Redemption)

A Consummation Devoutly To Be Wish’d -The Speech of Hamlet, The Desire of Ending

To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep, No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and … Continue reading A Consummation Devoutly To Be Wish’d -The Speech of Hamlet, The Desire of Ending

Invisible Sun & The History Of Surrealism Part 2: Breton, Bataille, and Surrealism

This is a continuation of the piece I started here. For lack of an introduction, I suggest you read part 1 if you haven't already looked at it. This post will be looking at the Surrealist movement proper through Andre Breton, Salvador Dali, and Georges Bataille. I will also talk about Antonin Artaud and Walter … Continue reading Invisible Sun & The History Of Surrealism Part 2: Breton, Bataille, and Surrealism